Oil Painting “Beavertail Lighthouse at Dusk” by Daniel S. Dahlstrom and a Poem by Carl Sandburg “Dreams in the Dusk”

"Dusk" (Beavertail Light at Beavertail Park in Rhode Island)-Lighthouse

“Dusk” (Beavertail Light at Beavertail Park In Rhode Island)-Lighthouse

Hello All,

An artist is often asked “why did you paint this subject matter?” And this is the “why” of “Beavertail Lighthouse at Dusk.” By the way, this painting recently sold!

Inspiration for “Dusk” came about on a very blustery day. We wanted to check out the waves at Beavertail Park in Rhode Island because someone on Facebook posted how choppy the waters were on the bay. So off we went on an adventure looking for waves.

Upon our arrival, we discovered not quite as choppy as we thought but very blustery and chilly. I, as usual, stayed in the car and watched Dan wander around camera in hand. Too cold to do any “plein air” painting. He captured the essence of the day as it traveled into dusk and another painting was born. This one is on the large side–32″W by 62″L and was on display at the Ethel Walker School Bell Library located in Simsbury, Conncticut. And it sold from this exhibit. We were very excited to have it travel to a new home. This is the third time Dan painted the Beavertail Light and all three paintings sold. Chapel at the Ethel Walker School Picture of the Ethel Walker School Chapel….perhaps another painting?

carl sandburg Picture of Carl Sandburg, who was called the “people’s poet”. He was born on January 6, 1878 in Galesburg, Illinois and died on July 22, 1967.”Dreams in the Dusk”.

Here is his poem:

Dreams in the dusk,
Only dreams closing the day
And with the day’s close going back
To the gray things, the dark things,
The far, deep things of dreamland.

Dreams, only dreams in the dusk,
Only the old remembered pictures
Of lost days when the day’s loss
Wrote in tears the heart’s loss.

Tears and loss and broken dreams
May find your heart at dusk.

Today’s quote: victorborge1

Victor Borge Victor Borge was once called “the funniest pianist on Earth” by The Washington Post. He toured the world for decades with his popular one-man show, which mixed classical piano performance with quips, wordplay and pratfalls.
Name at Birth: Børge Rosenbaum.
Born: January 3, 1909 (age 108), Copenhagen, Denmark
Died: December 23, 2000

My grandmother, Omi, and I always looked forward to seeing him on TV. He was wonderful!

Enjoy today!

Best,
Dan (the artist) and Nancy (the blogger) 10698540_10152770976077170_8091882194187730116_n

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“Summer Stroll by the Sea” Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom and Art Exhibit at the Gilded Lily–“Works in Oil by Dan Dahlstrom”

Morning all,

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“Summer Stroll by the Sea” Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom, Artist

“Summer Stroll by the Sea” happened by accident. Dan and I had to make a trip to Massachusetts, and heading back we took a wrong turn. We didn’t care (had all day), and it was a lovely summer’s day–wasn’t really too hot for a July day. Out of nowhere we came upon the state park, beach and food. Dan grabbed his camera and off we headed to the boardwalk, a bench and food. And then we walked–as we rounded a bend, unbelievable vistas greeted us. Dan just started shooting, and planning paintings.

We walked down to the water to check out the waves, and a woman dressed in a long, flowing skirt and braided hair passed us. As she strolled by and away from us, we looked at each other with one of those looks that says “painting”.  At one point, she seemed to be alone on the beach; even though, there were children playing, all around us, in the sand with their pails and splashing in the water. But their voices seemed to disappear as she moved away from us, and all you could hear were the waves lapping the shore and the cries of the seagulls.

I felt as if I was standing in one of Dan’s paintings, and I could hardly wait to get home so he could start composing. We wondered where she was going–heading home or walking away from home or just like us, stumbled upon the beach and just decided to take a stroll. She belonged on the cover of a romance novel, and maybe that is yet to come.

“Summer Stroll by the Sea” started at Horseneck Beach State Reservation Park located in Westport Point, MA off of Route 88. The info phone number for the park is: 508.636.8817.

Horseneck State Park is 600 acres of barrier beach and salt marsh located at the western end of Buzzards Bay. The park also touches on Westport River, Westport Harbor, Horseneck Channel, The Let, and Rhode Island Sound-so many places of water to capture on canvas. There is a 2 mile long sandy beach, which provides a place for excellent windsurfing or just plain old walking and exploring, including dunes. Behind the dunes is a campsite providing 100 sites, which is near Gooseberry Neck. And if you enjoy watching birds, this area is one of the ideal spots to do this because of the ocean, beach, and estuary habitat; not to mention an awesome place to paint, photograph, meditate or reflect.

Here are some photographs of Horseneck Beach State Park:

Flag at Sunset
“Flag at Sunset”
Sunset at Horseneck Park

“Sunset at Horseneck Beach State Park”

Deer at Horseneck Park

“Deer at Sunset at Horseneck Beach State Park”

Picture taken of Horseneck Beach State Park by Daniel S. Dahlstrom, Artist. We loved this park!
Feb 10, 2012 strong painting options 021

Thought this would be a good place to interject Dan’s newest painting:

“Slaty-backed Gull”—Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom, Artist

Slaty-backed Gull

Quote by Helen Keller:

220px-Hellen_Keller_circa_1920

“I could never stay long enough on the shore; the tang of the untainted, fresh, and full sea air was like a cool, quieting thought”

“Summer Stroll by the Sea” is on display/for sale at the Gilded Lily Gallery, Milford, Connecticut. It is featured in Dan’s exhibit at the gallery: “Works in Oil by Dan Dahlstrom” and will be on display thru August 2016. Dan will also be doing an oil painting demo on 8/6 (Sat) from 2-6pm. Public is invited. Free and Light Refreshments will be Served.

ls

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Bye from Nancy (the blogger) and Dan (the artist)

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“Winter Wonderland” (Elizabeth Park, Hartford, CT) Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom and Poem by John Clare “The Winter’s Spring”

Hi all,

It is almost Christmas, and a cold snap is coming our way. It snowed the other day, and was very seasonal.

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Oil Painting “Winter Wonderland” (Elizabeth Park, Hartford, Connecticut) by Daniel S. Dahlstrom

Little bit of information about Elizabeth Park, which is a very beautiful park. If you are in the Hartford, Connecticut area you should visit it. The information was gleaned from their website.

“GARDENS AND GROUNDS OF ELIZABETH PARK
Opened to the public in 1897, Elizabeth Park is the horticultural park of the Hartford park system. Because of its gardens, it has been

called the, “Flower of New England Parks.” The rose garden is the heart and soul of the park and is the first public rose garden in the

country, opened in 1904.

When the city took over the estate from Charles Pond, as Elizabeth Park, there were already a large variety of trees and existing

plantings. The city hired Swiss-born landscape architect Theodore Wirth to design the park. Using his training from his work in Paris

and London, Mr. Wirth created a true botanical park with Victorian formal gardens, which comprise a large variety of flowers, shrubs,

and trees with a country vista as a backdrop.

Elizabeth Park is 101 acres located in both West Hartford and Hartford, Connecticut. For over 100 years, the rose garden at Elizabeth

Park has been an attraction for thousands of people each year. It is a major attraction for Hartford and Connecticut residents and is

considered one of the major tourist destinations for national and international visitors.” (info borrowed from their website).

elizabeth park

This is what the gazebo looks like “in- bloom”. It is beautiful in all seasons.

Andrew Wyeth, an artist, liked to create his paintings in the winter, and here is why. Andrew_Wyeth

“I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape. Something waits beneath it; the whole story doesn’t show.”

Winter does have a bit of magic to it, and the light is fantastic to paint. And this is how Dan’s “Winter Wonderland” painting evolved.

A photograph of Elizabeth Park in Winter showed up on our Facebook Page-the Executive Director of the Conservatory was driving into

the park on this very snowy, stormy day and just loved how the park was looking and captured it with her camera. I contacted her and

asked permission if Dan could use the photograph as a subject matter for one of his oil paintings. She very graciously agreed and we

were off creating or I should say Dan was off to create. He changed the photograph a smidge because he wanted to enhance his

composition. Artists do that, and he is no exception to that rule.

I thought you might enjoy this poem by John Clare–“The Winter’s Spring

The Winter’s Spring

The winter comes; I walk alone,
I want no bird to sing;
To those who keep their hearts their own john clare
The winter is the spring.
No flowers to please—no bees to hum—
The coming spring’s already come.

I never want the Christmas rose
To come before its time;
The seasons, each as God bestows,
Are simple and sublime.
I love to see the snowstorm hing;
‘Tis but the winter garb of spring.

I never want the grass to bloom:
The snowstorm’s best in white.
I love to see the tempest come
And love its piercing light.
The dazzled eyes that love to cling
O’er snow-white meadows sees the spring.

I love the snow, the crumpling snow
That hangs on everything,
It covers everything below
Like white dove’s brooding wing,
A landscape to the aching sight,
A vast expanse of dazzling light.

It is the foliage of the woods
That winters bring—the dress,
White Easter of the year in bud,
That makes the winter Spring.
The frost and snow his posies bring,
Nature’s white spurts of the spring.

Thought for today:

annefrank121548

Wishing you a good one:

Nancy (the blogger) and Dan (the artist)

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Finding Inspiration for “Manhatten Mist” and Poem by Walt Whitman “Mannahatta”

"Manhatten Mist"
Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom–“Manhatten Mist”

Hi,

Where does inspiration come from? What is inspiration: “one that moves the intellect or emotions or prompts action or invention”. (one of the definitions from Webster’s II dictionary). The artist is inspired to paint a particular subject and hopefully, someone is inspired by the art. What is the story and inspiration for “Manhatten Mist.”

It was a very early misty, December morning in Manhatten, and the city looked surreal, as if it was another world. And not too many people were around so it almost looked deserted, and it was presenting itself as if it wanted to be painted.

Dan was near Grand Central Station, New York, and was just walking around photographing the sights and streets. One of the streets that he was shooting on had depth of field–it disappeared into the mist (low lying fog). The flow of the street had some of the same similarities as the flow of a river, both can seem to disappear into the horizon.

There was a glow to the mist as the sunlight began to burn through it, and Dan wanted to capture this glow onto his canvas. The city reminded him of his landscape palettes–earth tones of browns and grays. His color palette was muted and monotone and his instrument was a brush to create straighter, geometric patterns. Many times he uses a palette knife to create his art, or a combination of both knife and brush.

The city was dismal and depressing that day (later in the afternoon, there was a huge snowstorm), but Dan captured beauty in that scene and made it mysterious and ethereal.

So many people have commented that they know where that street is, and have stood on the same spot that he decided to build the painting around. This was one painting that had to be completed in the studio–the street was no place to set up his easel.

Varnish was applied to the finished painting to give it a deeper, richer look.  Varnish, in some cases, enhances the painting and gives it a very old, world look.

Thought you would enjoy a poem about Manhatten by Walt Whitman: Walt_Whitman_-_George_Collins_Cox

Mannahatta
by: Walt Whitman (1819-1892)

I was asking for something specific and perfect for my city,
Whereupon lo! upsprang the aboriginal name.

Now I see what there is in a name, a word, liquid, sane, unruly,
musical, self-sufficient,
I see that the word of my city is that word from of old,
Because I see that word nested in nests of water-bays, superb,
Rich, hemm’d thick all around with sailships and steamships, an
island sixteen miles long, solid-founded,
Numberless crowded streets, high growths of iron, slender, strong,
light, splendidly uprising toward clear skies,
Tides swift and ample, well-loved by me, toward sundown,
The flowing sea-currents, the little islands, larger adjoining
islands, the heights, the villas,
The countless masts, the white shore-steamers, the lighters, the
ferry-boats, the black sea-steamers well-model’d,
The down-town streets, the jobbers’ houses of business, the houses
of business of the ship-merchants and money-brokers, the river-streets,
Immigrants arriving, fifteen or twenty thousand in a week,
The carts hauling goods, the manly race of drivers of horses, the
brown-faced sailors,
The summer air, the bright sun shining, and the sailing clouds aloft,
The winter snows, the sleigh-bells, the broken ice in the river,
passing along up or down with the flood-tide or ebb-tide,
The mechanics of the city, the masters, well-form’d,
beautiful-faced, looking you straight in the eyes,
Trottoirs throng’d, vehicles, Broadway, the women, the shops and shows,
A million people–manners free and superb–open voices–hospitality–
the most courageous and friendly young men,
City of hurried and sparkling waters! city of spires and masts!
City nested in bays! my city!

Thought for today by Walt Whitman:

waltwhitman146847

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This oil painting, “Manhatten Mist” is on exhibit/for sale at the Gilded Lily Gallery in Milford, Connecticut…owned by Rosemary Celon-Gordon and Barry Gordon. Hope you get a chance to check it out…awesome gallery, great stuff and the owners are terrific to work with.

Comments are always welcome!

Wishing you a good one,

10698540_10152770976077170_8091882194187730116_n

Nancy (the blogger) and Dan (the artist)
Proud Members of Middlesex Chamber of Commerce

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“Manhatten Mist” a City Scape Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom and a Walt Whitman Poem “Manhatten Streets”


“Manhatten Mist” an oil painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom

And what is the story and inspiration for this piece of art?

It was a very early misty, December morning in Manhatten, and the city looked surreal, as if it was another world. And not too many people were around so it almost looked deserted, and it was presenting itself as if it wanted to be painted.

Dan was near Grand Central Station, New York, and was just walking around photographing the sights and streets. One of the streets that he was shooting on had depth of field–it disappeared into the mist (low lying fog). The flow of the street had some of the same similarities as the flow of a river, both can seem to disappear into the horizon.

There was a glow to the mist as the sunlight began to burn through it, and Dan wanted to capture this glow onto his canvas. The city reminded him of his landscape palettes–earth tones of browns and grays. His color palette was muted and monotone and his instrument was a brush to create straighter, geometric patterns. Many times he uses a palette knife to create his art, or a combination of both knife and brush.

The city was dismal and depressing that day (later in the afternoon, there was a huge snowstorm), but Dan captured beauty in that scene and made it mysterious and ethereal.

So many people have commented that they know where that street is, and have stood on the same spot that he decided to build the painting around. This was one painting that had to be completed in the studio–the street was no place to set up his easel.

Varnish was applied to the finished painting to give it a deeper, richer look.  Varnish, in some cases, enhances the painting and gives it a very old, world look.

This oil painting is on exhibit/for sale at the Gilded Lily Gallery in Milford, Connecticut…owned by Rosemary Celon-Gordon and Barry Gordon. Hope you get a chance to check it out…awesome gallery, great stuff and the owners are terrific to work with.

Following is a poem by Walt Whitman: “Manhatten’s Streets:

I saunter’d, pondering,
On time, space, reality–on such as these, and abreast with them,
prudence.

After all, the last explanation remains to be made about prudence;
Little and large alike drop quietly aside from the prudence that
suits immortality.

The Soul is of itself;
All verges to it–all has reference to what ensues;
All that a person does, says, thinks, is of consequence;
Not a move can a man or woman make, that affects him or her in a day,
month, any part of the direct life-time, or the hour of death,
but the same affects him or her onward afterward through the
indirect life-time.

The indirect is just as much as the direct,
The spirit receives from the body just as much as it gives to the
body, if not more.

Not one word or deed–not venereal sore, discoloration, privacy of
the onanist, putridity of gluttons or rum-drinkers, peculation,
cunning, betrayal, murder, seduction, prostitution, but has
results beyond death, as really as before death.

Charity and personal force are the only investments worth anything.

No specification is necessary–all that a male or female does, that
is vigorous, benevolent, clean, is so much profit to him or
her, in the unshakable order of the universe, and through the
whole scope of it forever.

Who has been wise, receives interest,
Savage, felon, President, judge, farmer, sailor, mechanic, literat,
young, old, it is the same,
The interest will come round–all will come round.

Singly, wholly, to affect now, affected their time, will forever
affect all of the past, and all of the present, and all of the
future,
All the brave actions of war and peace,
All help given to relatives, strangers, the poor, old, sorrowful,
young children, widows, the sick, and to shunn’d persons,
All furtherance of fugitives, and of the escape of slaves,
All self-denial that stood steady and aloof on wrecks, and saw others
fill the seats of the boats,
All offering of substance or life for the good old cause, or for a
friend’s sake, or opinion’s sake,
All pains of enthusiasts, scoff’d at by their neighbors,
All the limitless sweet love and precious suffering of mothers,
All honest men baffled in strifes recorded or unrecorded,
All the grandeur and good of ancient nations whose fragments we
inherit,
All the good of the dozens of ancient nations unknown to us by name,
date, location,
All that was ever manfully begun, whether it succeeded or no,
All suggestions of the divine mind of man, or the divinity of his
mouth, or the shaping of his great hands;
All that is well thought or said this day on any part of the globe–
or on any of the wandering stars, or on any of the fix’d stars,
by those there as we are here;
All that is henceforth to be thought or done by you, whoever you are,
or by any one;
These inure, have inured, shall inure, to the identities from which
they sprang, or shall spring.

Did you guess anything lived only its moment?
The world does not so exist–no parts palpable or impalpable so
exist;

No consummation exists without being from some long previous
consummation–and that from some other,
Without the farthest conceivable one coming a bit nearer the
beginning than any.

Whatever satisfies Souls is true;
Prudence entirely satisfies the craving and glut of Souls;
Itself only finally satisfies the Soul;
The Soul has that measureless pride which revolts from every lesson
but its own.

Now I give you an inkling;
Now I breathe the word of the prudence that walks abreast with time,
space, reality,
That answers the pride which refuses every lesson but its own.

What is prudence, is indivisible,
Declines to separate one part of life from every part,
Divides not the righteous from the unrighteous, or the living from
the dead,
Matches every thought or act by its correlative,
Knows no possible forgiveness, or deputed atonement,
Knows that the young man who composedly peril’d his life and lost it,
has done exceedingly well for himself without doubt,
That he who never peril’d his life, but retains it to old age in
riches and ease, has probably achiev’d nothing for himself
worth mentioning;
Knows that only that person has really learn’d, who has learn’d to
prefer results,
Who favors Body and Soul the same,
Who perceives the indirect assuredly following the direct,
Who in his spirit in any emergency whatever neither hurries or,
avoids death.

Wishing you a good one!

Nancy (the blogger) and Dan (the artist)

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Inspiration for “The Maggie P” (historic site in Old Saybrook, Connecticut)–an oil painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom


“The Maggie P” (Old Saybrook, Connecticut) — Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom, Chester, Connecticut Artist

Hi all,
Interesting story to Dan’s painting “The Maggie P, Old Saybrook”. The “Maggie P”started out its’ life as a tugboat, and ended up in its current location in the late 1800’s or early 1900’s-in Fenwick, Connecticut. The river steamboat captains used this place as an early version of a “man-cave”, and the story goes that it was also used as a special place that housed ladies. Eventually, years later, it ended up as a cute, tiny cottage here on Long Island Sound. It is a landmark of sorts for local residents.

Apparently, you can see this cottage from the 4th hole of the public golf course in Fenwick, which is a section of Old Saybrook.

Dan has always been intrigued by this interesting home, and his inspiration to create a painting came from the famous painting “Motif No 1, and the subject for this painting is the dark, red shack located on a Bearskin Neck Wharf in Rockport, MA. So many artists from around the world have used this red shack as their subject. And I know that one of these days, we will scope out this area, and Dan will find a special something to paint.

The day that Dan went down to “the Maggie P” to photograph, was a beautiful, brilliant day-it had a very tropical look to it. And the swans floating around near the house created a look and feel of peace and serenity. The scene was screaming to be painted. Many times he starts his creative process with his camera. Light is fleeting and so is time…when he can he also enjoys doing the “en plein air ” thing–painting in the fresh air.

To begin with Dan blocked out the shapes on the canvas by using a palette knife and then utilized a brush to do the final steps-originally there was a heavy outlay of paint giving it depth. Many of his paintings are started out with the palette knife-you can lay down paint very quickly with the knife. And then brushes are used for the fine tuning, so to speak. Dan has several students, who take art lessons from him, and one of his students loves to use brushes and paper towels. She works her canvas fervently with that piece of paper towel. So you can use whatever you like to work your magic.

This is the dark, red shack in Rockport, MA that has become so famous—so many artists gravitate toward this place to paint this icon.

A home can be a former tugboat now housed in Connecticut.

“I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to.”
– Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

Wishing you all a good one….

Nancy (the blogger) and Dan (the artist)

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“Reflecting” a Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom and Poem by Emerson “Water”

"Reflecting"

The composition of “Reflecting” is an October late afternoon scene of Wickford, RI. Dan and I were on our way home from visiting Wickford. As we were leaving town, the late afternoon sun caught our attention, and Dan’s artistic eye. The essence of the day reminded Dan of works by Frederick J. Mulhaupt, who used the same colors as depicted in the Wickford water scene.

The mirror image, reflecting in the water, and the colors just lit up the atmosphere and the detail of the house and trees. Everything was falling into place, and the structure of the painting was a discussion for the ride home.

The structure or composition of “Reflecting” started by laying in the sky and water onto the canvas with a palette knife.

“Working with a knife is a quicker process than using a brush, and I like starting out with this tool, ” stated Dan.

To block out the main shapes in the sky and water, a brush is used at this point. Working the sky and water with a brush strengthens the chroma or color of the composition, and shores up the detailing.

You start traveling through the painting from the lower right hand corner and ride the current around the bend of the house, through the magnificent reflection in the water, and past the late October light illuminating the house and trees. The trees almost look as if they are on fire. What do you think? Feel free to respond!

Another scene of Wickford and Dan did paint the church scene and it sold! Wickford is a beautiful town with many wonderful shops, restaurants, and art galleries–great place to explore.

Water
BY RALPH WALDO EMERSON <
The water understands
Civilization well;
It wets my foot, but prettily,
It chills my life, but wittily,
It is not disconcerted,
It is not broken-hearted:
Well used, it decketh joy,
Adorneth, doubleth joy:
Ill used, it will destroy,
In perfect time and measure
With a face of golden pleasure
Elegantly destroy.

Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom–“Reflection of Wickford” (Rhode Island) and this did sell!

Dan will be having a “Meet and Greet Reception” at the Acton Library, Old Saybrook, Connecticut on Saturday, October 10, 2015 from 9:00 until 10:30. We will be in the Community Room on the second floor for the reception, and looking forward to it. His oil paintings will be on display for the month of October. Public is invited and there is no charge.

Wishing you a good one!
Nancy (the blogger) and Dan (the artist)

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Oil Paintings “Hydrangeas in Blue Pot” and “White Hydrangeas from Garden” by Daniel S. Dahlstrom and “The Glory of the Garden” by Rudyard Kipling

"Hydrangeas in Blue Pot"
“Hydrangeas in Blue Pot” — Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom

I felt that Rudyard Kipling’s poem “The Glory of the Garden” would be a good choice to compliment the paintings–both were composed in our garden. “Hydrangeas in a Blue Pot” was painted plein air (in the open air or outside), and “White Hydrangeas from Garden” was a still life from our garden. This arrangement was put together on our deck, and easel set up right then and there, and the glory of our garden was captured on canvas.

Hydrangeas are popular in English gardens, but for a time (20th century) people felt that they were old-fashioned, but they are now back
in favor. We have always loved them in our Connecticut gardens. Great reminder of the gardens on Cape Cod–we talk about heading
out there so that Dan can paint the Cape. Hopefully, one of these days.

“The Glory of the Garden”
by Rudyard Kipling

Our England is a garden that is full of stately views,
Of borders, beds and shrubberies and lawns and avenues

With statues on the terraces and peacocks strutting by;
But the Glory of the Garden lies in more than meets the eye.

For where the old thick laurels grow, along the thin red wall,
You will find the tool- and potting-sheds which are the heart of all ;
The cold-frames and the hot-houses, the dungpits and the tanks:
The rollers, carts and drain-pipes, with the barrows and the planks.

And there you’ll see the gardeners, the men and ‘prentice boys
Told off to do as they are bid and do it without noise;
For, except when seeds are planted and we shout to scare the birds,
The Glory of the Garden it abideth not in words.

And some can pot begonias and some can bud a rose,
And some are hardly fit to trust with anything that grows;
But they can roll and trim the lawns and sift the sand and loam,
For the Glory of the Garden occupieth all who come.
Our England is a garden, and such gardens are not made
By singing:–”Oh, how beautiful!” and sitting in the shade,
While better men than we go out and start their working lives
At grubbing weeds from gravel-paths with broken dinner-knives

There’s not a pair of legs so thin, there’s not a head so thick,
There’s not a hand so weak and white, nor yet a heart so sick.
But it can find some needful job that’s crying to be done,
For the Glory of the Garden glorifieth every one.

Then seek your job with thankfulness and work till further orders,
If it’s only netting strawberries or killing slugs on borders;
And when your back stops aching and your hands begin to harden,
You will find yourself a partner in the Glory of the Garden.

Oh, Adam was a gardener, and God who made him sees
That half a proper gardener’s work is done upon his knees,
So when your work is finished, you can wash your hand and pray
For the Glory of the Garden, that it may not pass away!
And the Glory of the Garden it shall never pass away!
“White Hydrangeas from the Garden” an oil painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom

Thought for Today:

Wishing you a good one!

Nancy (the blogger) and Dan (the artist)

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“Ely’s Ferry Boathouse” an oil painting and Emily Dickinson’s Poem “My River”

Ely's Ferry Boathouse

Ely's Ferry Boathouse


A Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom–a Connecticut Artist

Inspiration? What was the inspiration? We headed out for a Sunday drive and before we knew it, we were enroute to the Connecticut River and the Old Lyme/Lyme, Connecticut area. Our destination became Ely’s Ferry landing, on the Connecticut River, and greeting us was the most beautiful color display in the sky. And we knew that this vision was going to make it’s way onto a canvas. Dan grabbed his camera and proceeded to photograph this vista, and hurried because the timeline was fleeting and he wanted to capture every tiny fragment of the light. This area is steeped in wonderful historic meaning, and beauty. The Connecticut River is a magical place to be, and it was on this late afternoon. When we got home his new masterpiece “Ely’s Ferry Boathouse” was started, in his studio, from the wonderful photographs that he produced.

“Ely’s Ferry Boathouse” has a very interesting background-well the area does anyways, and who was the first Ely? In the Congressional Library in Washington, D.C., it is documented that Nicholas De Ely was the first Ely in history. He was the Bishop of Worcester in 1268 in England, and died in 1280. The De was removed from the name during the reign of Charles L, in 1638.

Richard Ely came to Boston in 1655 from Plymouth, England. He made his way to Lyme, Connecticut around 1660 and settled there. Lyme is one of the towns on the Connecticut River. He acquired Six Mile Island Farm and established Ely Landing and Ferry. The name of Ely’s Ferry and Ely’s Ferry Landing, has been preserved, and sections of the original farm are still owned by Richard Ely’s descendents. Richard Ely died in 1660.

Ely’s Ferry was a crossing for the horse drawn carriages, which connected Lyme to Essex, Connecticut and the Lower Post Road, via the Connecticut River. The Boston Post Road was  a mail delivery route between New York City, Boston and Massachusetts, and this route eventually became one of the first major highways in the United States.

The mail route was divided into three sections involving the Boston Post Road:

Lower Post Road (this is now Route 1)-this ran along the shoreline of Long Island Sound connecting to Rhode Island and north through Providence, Rhode Island to Boston, Massachusetts. This route basically follows the current US Route 1 in Eastern Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

Upper Post Road-this is now US 5 and 20, and it ran from New Haven, Connecticut to Springfield, Massachusetts.

Middle Post Road-this connected from the Upper Road in Hartford, Connecticut and split northward to Boston, Massachusetts by Pomfret, Connecticut.

There are many historic spots along this route-and Dan just might paint a few. Something to keep in mind for the future.

Currently, at Ely’s Ferry Road Landing is one of Connecticut’s boat launches-not a very fancy one but it works for a car top boat. You have access to the lower Connecticut River from this spot, and tidal wetlands. And of course, a great spot to paint and photograph. Dan has been photographing and painting this spot for years-he loves the Connecticut River and the historic significance of Ely’s Ferry Road, the farmland, and the town of Lyme.

After your history lesson, thought you might enjoy a poem by Emily Dickinson–“My River”.

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson was born on December 10, 1830 in Amherst, MA and died on May 15, 1886. She is considered to be on of Amercia’s finest 19th century poet, and wrote poetry most of her life. She coined this phrase: “It is better to be the hammer than the anvil.” I do wonder how people come up with their quotes.

The poem “My River” by Emily Dickinson

My river runs to thee.
Blue sea, wilt thou welcome me?
My river awaits reply.
Oh! sea, look graciously.

I’ll fetch thee brooks
from spotted nooks.
Say, sea, Take me!

Today’s quote is from Thomas Aquinas:

And who is Thomas Aquinas?

Comments are always welcome…

Wishing you a good one…has been a beautiful summer’s day here in Connecticut!

Best,
Nancy (the blogger) and Dan (the artist)

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Inspiration for oil painting “End of Day” and a poem by Walt Whitman “Song at Sunset”

Fine Art Oil Painting by Daniel S. Dahlstrom, Chester, Connecticut Artist “End of Day” (Old Saybrook, Connecticut)

Fine Art Oil Painting "End of Day" (Old Saybrook, Connecticut)

What was the creative process for “End of Day”:

Dan had been out painting “en plein air” (in the open air or outside)in the North Cove area of Old Saybrook during the morning hours. He had been taking classes to hone his craft and produced some great daytime paintings (which has since sold), and he decided he wanted to capture a sunset of the area. So he waited for a spectacular evening and off he went with his camera to North Cove. At this time of the day, he was not going to set up his easel and paint as the skies darkened-not a good idea. As the sky filled with the unusual colorization of the sunset-reds, oranges, and yellows reflecting in the water, against the blues, purples and greens  of the landmasses, his inspiration filled as well. This contrasting of colors produced an interesting depth of field, which he wanted to capture on canvas, and now you see the end result—“End of Day.”

Also, thought that you might enjoy this poem by Walt Whitman:

Song at Sunset. by Walt Whitman

SPLENDOR of ended day, floating and filling me!
Hour prophetic—hour resuming the past!
Inflating my throat—you, divine average!
You, Earth and Life, till the last ray gleams, I sing
Open mouth of my Soul, uttering gladness,
Eyes of my Soul, seeing perfection,
Natural life of me, faithfully praising things;
Corroborating forever the triumph of things.

Illustrious every one!
Illustrious what we name space—sphere of unnumber’d spirits;
Illustrious the mystery of motion, in all beings, even the tiniest insect;
Illustrious the attribute of speech—the senses—the body;
Illustrious the passing light! Illustrious the pale reflection on the new moon in the
western
sky!
Illustrious whatever I see, or hear, or touch, to the last.

Good in all,
In the satisfaction and aplomb of animals,
In the annual return of the seasons,
In the hilarity of youth,
In the strength and flush of manhood,
In the grandeur and exquisiteness of old age,
In the superb vistas of Death.

Wonderful to depart;
Wonderful to be here!
The heart, to jet the all-alike and innocent blood!
To breathe the air, how delicious!
To speak! to walk! to seize something by the hand!
To prepare for sleep, for bed—to look on my rose-color’d flesh;
To be conscious of my body, so satisfied, so large;
To be this incredible God I am;
To have gone forth among other Gods—these men and women I love.

Wonderful how I celebrate you and myself!
How my thoughts play subtly at the spectacles around!
How the clouds pass silently overhead!
How the earth darts on and on! and how the sun, moon, stars, dart on and on!
How the water sports and sings! (Surely it is alive!)
How the trees rise and stand up—with strong trunks—with branches and leaves!
(Surely there is something more in each of the tree—some living Soul.)

O amazement of things! even the least particle!
O spirituality of things!
O strain musical, flowing through ages and continents—now reaching me and America!
I take your strong chords—I intersperse them, and cheerfully pass them forward.

I too carol the sun, usher’d, or at noon, or, as now, setting,
I too throb to the brain and beauty of the earth, and of all the growths of the earth,
I too have felt the resistless call of myself.

As I sail’d down the Mississippi,
As I wander’d over the prairies,
As I have lived—As I have look’d through my windows, my eyes,
As I went forth in the morning—As I beheld the light breaking in the east;
As I bathed on the beach of the Eastern Sea, and again on the beach of the Western Sea;
As I roam’d the streets of inland Chicago—whatever streets I have roam’d;
Or cities, or silent woods, or peace, or even amid the sights of war;
Wherever I have been, I have charged myself with contentment and triumph.

I sing the Equalities, modern or old,
I sing the endless finales of things;
I say Nature continues—Glory continues;
I praise with electric voice;
For I do not see one imperfection in the universe;
And I do not see one cause or result lamentable at last in the universe.

O setting sun! though the time has come,
I still warble under you, if none else does, unmitigated adoration.

Quote by Walt Whitman—-

“End of Day” (as of 8/1/2015 and through August) is on display at “The Atrium Gallery” in the Department of Transportation Building in Berlin, Connecticut. We are very excited to have an oil painting exhibit at this gallery.

As always, we welcome comments and questions—please feel free to contact us.

Wishing you a wonderful day…little bit on the warm side in Connecticut this first day of August.

Best,
Nancy (the blogger) and Dan (the artist)

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